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The three faces of Sheryl Sculley: As a waitress on the invitation to the League of Women Voters fundraiser where she will be roasted. As King Anchovy on the stage of the Empire Theater during Cornyation. And as City Manager with former City Councilwoman Elena Guajardo who's organizing the roast.

League of Women Voters to roast Sheryl "King Anchovy" Sculley
QSanAntonio.com, September 4, 2009

When last we spoke to former City Councilwoman Elena Guajardo she was looking for Cornyation performers who could offer some interesting backstage dish about City Manager Sheryl Sculley who served as King Anchovy for this year's production.

Guajardo, who’s organizing the League of Women Voters roast of Sculley on September 11, is looking for people with stories to tell.

"Instead of a traditional roast, the evening will feature various speakers who will offer personal glimpses of Sheryl Sculley as public servant, friend, and mother," says Guajardo.

So far Guajardo's lined up Sculley's gal pal Jeannie Garcia, four members of County Commissioner Nelson Wolf's clan and hairdresser Rene Roberts.

Then why the hunt for Cornyation gossip? Could it be the red metallic jumpsuit that Sculley wore during the performance? What about the blue sequined cape and those platform boots? A City Manager with this much moxie can no doubt be the inspiration for many an antic tale.

Check out this video of the City Manager on stage as King Anchovy.

Whether those Cornyation folk show up or not, a long list of local luminaries and politicos will be on hand at the Oak Hills Country Club to fete Sculley on her special evening.

Guajardo says that tickets are still available and invites anyone with a good Sheryl Sculley story to come to the shindig and raise a glass in her honor.

League of Women Voters Roast City Manager Sheryl Sculley. Friday, September 11, 2009 at the Oak Hills Country Club. Silent Auction and Cocktails from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Single tickets are $55 and a double ticket is $100. To purchase tickets, make check payable to LWVSA, 1809 Blanco Road, San Antonio TX 78212. For more information call Elena Guajardo at 210-778-9700.

Lawyer slams City Manager on job protection for gay city employees
QSanAntonio.com, November 6, 2008

Robert J. Bozelli, an attorney who practices law in Dripping Springs, Texas, has blasted City Manager Sheryl Sculley for a change made to the City of San Antonio’s anti-harassment and discrimination policy that now includes sexual orientation as a protected classification.

In an editorial published in the San Antonio Express-News on November 6, Bozelli writes that, "one unelected person has issued an edict to protect sexual orientation, a decision far beyond what is required by law."

The "edict" Bozelli refers to is Administrative Directive 4.67 which was revised in January 2008 and adds sexual orientation to sex, race age, religion, ethnic group, political affiliation and physical disability to the list of reasons that cannot be used to harass or fire city employees.

Bozelli argues that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act does not include sexual orientation and therefore the city has no need to include it either. He maintains that Sculley should not have acted alone, that the City Council or the electorate should have voted on the matter.

Sculley clearly overstepped her bounds writes Bozelli: "The immediate focus, however, is not the substance of the decision but the process followed by your city government in setting this policy. If the city manager has been delegated the authority to exercise this type of power, then the process is valid. If there is no such authority granted to the city manager, the raw exercise of power is invalid."

Sculley did not act alone as Bozelli maintains. The language for the change emerged from a recommendation made by the city’s Affirmative Action Advisory Committee which is composed of eleven citizens who are appointed by the City Council. The members represent each City Council District and the Mayor’s office. According to information on the city’s Web site, the Committee monitors "all City personnel actions for classified and unclassified positions and evaluates affirmative action goal achievements."

One member of the Committee, Dr. Lynne Armstrong, came under fire in August 2007 when anti-gay Christian extremists organized by KSLR-AM radio sought to block her re-appointment to the committee because she is a lesbian. The City Council approved Dr. Armstrong’s reappointment unanimously.

A comment posted to the Express-News Web site on the page where the editorial appears offers an interesting rationale for Bozelli’s protestations: "I think at the root of this dissent masked as a procedural debate is really a religious motive that takes a ‘moral’ position on sexual orientation. This is NOT a sexual debate, because regardless of your sexual orientation, you are still expected to perform professionally."

That argument rings true considering that Bozelli got his law degree in 1999 from Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, a college founded by anti-gay televangelist Pat Robertson in 1978.

S.A. City Manager addresses the Stonewall Democrats
QSanAntonio, October 17, 2006

The Stonewall Democrats of San Antonio played host to City Manager Sheryl Sculley at their October 16 meeting where she spoke about some of the accomplishments of her first year’s tenure, and of the many challenges that lay ahead in her newly-adopted city.

Speaking before the audience in a dark business suit and light-colored running shoes, Sculley looked like a big-city professional ready for a homeward commute. The running shoes, she explained, were a necessary comfort for a foot that she sprained while jogging the day before. She is an avid runner and says she tries to run in a different part of the city everyday.

There is no doubt that Sculley is an accomplished professional. Before being hired in November 2005, she served as the Assistant City Manager for the City of Phoenix for 16 years, assisting in the day-to-day management of 14,000 employees and a $2.6 billion annual operating budget. Prior to that she worked for the City of Kalamazoo, Michigan for five years as City Manager. In San Antonio, Sculley oversees a capital budget more than $1.7 billion and supervises all the city’s departments and its 12,000 employees.

Since coming to San Antonio Sculley has hired a new police chief, made 35 job appointments and initiated an innovative budget, the "5-85" Plan, where 85 percent of all monies are spent on the city’s top five priorities. Those priorities include more police and fire fighters, more EMT services, street improvements and enhanced code compliance. She has also raised the minimum wage for all city employees to $9.75 per hour.

One of Sculley’s plans for the future is a $550 million bond program, which is five times larger than any ever proposed by the city. Another new item on the horizon is an upcoming switch to an automated trash pick up service that has required a bit of lobbying to neighborhood groups. The wish list also includes finding funds for more parks and libraries.

Sculley’s 20-minute talk to the Stonewall Democrats ended with a brief question and answer session. The questions centered mainly on trash pickup, street improvement, clean air and employee health benefits. The City Manager was perfectly at ease with her audience and projected a poised and professional demeanor.

Sculley’s most notable accomplishment, to this observer, is the breath of fresh air she brings to city government. For the GLBT community this has meant inclusion, for the first time, in community panels that she organized for citizens to discuss and devise ways to enhance the quality of life in our city. This inclusive attitude is a good thing and one can only hope for more of it during the City Manager’s tenure. "Change is difficult," Sculley told her Stonewall audience, "but we all can change to make a better city."